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Hurricane Irma: Can it be as dangerous as Harvey or Katrina?

Twelve years ago, Hurricane Wilma made landfall in the United States, hitting Florida, causing 62 deaths and estimated damage totals in the billions. Last month, Hurricane Harvey became the first major storm to hit the United States in 12 years and it destroyed the majority of Houston, leaving thousands homeless and costing billions of dollars in damage. While the cleanup began in Texas, another storm was building up in the Atlantic Ocean, and this storm would become one of the strongest hurricanes on record. The storm named Irma now aims for Florida with evil intentions on its mind.

Hurricane Irma sweeps over the Caribbean.
Photo from BusinessInsider.com

Currently, Irma is a category 3 hurricane with winds of 125 mph. That might not sound as intimidating as a category 5 hurricane with winds of 185 mph as Irma was just 3 days ago. Each storm is different; they have their own DNA and are formed in various ways. The main factor in each storm is where they hit, You can have the most dangerous storm on record and it stays away from land. Which is why most likely you’ve never heard of Marie and Patricia, storms off in the Pacific Ocean.

The main factor of a hurricane becoming famous is where it goes. Hurricanes want to travel north but with the pull of the wind, they usually end up hitting land before being absorbed by another system, or start spinning around in a circle in the ocean like a hopeless football fan waiting for the NFL season to start.  The Saffir-Simpson scale was updated in 2010 to measure the factor of hurricanes’ effect on major cities.  A category 2 can have more effect on a major city than a category 5 in a rural area, and when a category 3, 4, or 5 hits a major city, it equals catastrophic conditions that made Harvey and Katrina the perfect storms. Irma is on the path to join them, killing 60+ in the Caribbean already. We hope that everyone is well prepared for Irma and we hope for the damage to be minimal.