Fighting Video Games are still Kicking (and Punching)

Video games have become a heavily integrated part of our daily lives. It is common and in fact expected that most people have a video game system and some type of favorite game. Admittedly, this is not universally true. Poverty is something a lot of people deal with; financial situations are different for everyone, and they are ever changing on a person by person basis. Nonetheless, most of us (of the younger generation, at least) often ask about the video games others play, especially if you are getting to know someone. Who doesn’t play video games, right? But let’s save the class issues for another time.

Moving on, there are many different video game genres to pick from and an increasing number of video game systems to pick from. Most people will usually answer something like the PlayStation 4 or the Xbox One for the system of choice and then something like first person shooters or RPGs (Role Playing Games) for the genre. A genre that is not necessarily popular per se but has a steady fan base is fighting video games.

Photo from injustice.com

Fighting games are enjoyable and desired because they offer a simple premise and objective while still offering countless scenarios, changes, and options to the player. They can stay consistent without being boring. The idea itself is simple; fight and defeat your opponent by making them run out of whatever represents their health/ stamina. But the player has countless options for how to go about doing so, from stringing attacks into combos to using whatever special, and usually character specific, attack they have at their disposal. Then they also have to deal with an opponent, either controlled by the computer or by a person, who has the same amount of options available to them.

No two fights or matches are ever exactly the same. You can always expect something new and different (to a certain extent) each time you play. This is especially true nowadays with games like Mortal Combat X and Injustice 2 that have increasing rosters of new and familiar characters to choose from along with long lists of attacks and combos. More options mean greater possibilities. These days, the games even offer downloadable content (DLC), almost always consisting of at least one new character, as time goes on to keep players interested and invested in the game. There is something to be said for a form of interactive entertainment that can keep a (relatively) simple and basic format while constantly changing.