A history of Daylight Savings Time

November 5th is Daylight Savings Time, and yes, you get to catch up on your sleep as clocks move back one hour—but that’s not the only thing Daylight Savings Time does.

Ben Franklin had proposed the idea centuries before it was implemented . This was after Franklin woke up at 6 a.m. and saw the morning sun. He repeated this for three days and found the same result.

photo from wallpup.com
photo from wallpup.com

Franklin’s idea for Daylight Savings was to save money and with this, expensive candle use would be cut down with free light from the sun but it wasn’t until 1895 before the idea was heard from again.

George Hudson from New Zealand saw the idea as a way to have more after-work sunshine to do things. His proposal was to have a two hour shift but again this didn’t happen

Seven years later, William Willett, a builder from Britain thought of the idea while riding his horse. He would take his idea to Parliament where he had support from Winston Churchill but the British Parliament rejected the idea.

Willett would argue for the idea until his death in 1915, he’s now known as the great-great grandfather of Chris Martin, frontman  of Coldplay.

A year after Willett’s death and two years into World War I, the idea was brought up by the German government. They needed to save energy, and with that Daylight Savings Time was utilized. Soon after, every country that was fighting in WWI followed suit and with just moving back the clocks, energy was being saved.

After WWI, the idea was dropped and picked up again during World War II.

After the war, the idea again was abandoned. However in the 1960’s, Daylight Savings Time was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, helping the country though the Energy Crisis in the 1970’s.

In today’s age, Daylight Savings is no longer useful in the United States and doesn’t save energy. However, some areas around the world need the change to  survive.

Just relish in the fact that on November 3, you get to have that extra hour of sleep but only to lose it in March of next year.