Bamboo voodoo

Bamboo Craft is one model in the line of magic-like tablet devices. To make, it clear these tablet devices are not tablet computers, though they do work on a similar concept. These tablets are pressure sensitive. They allow for more natural drawing styles for those who spend their time working on graphics programs such as Adobe Illustrator. The tablet can plug into any computer using an USB port.

This doesn’t mean they don’t have a place in the general marketable public, but at prices starting around $150, they aren’t exactly the cheapest toy on the block, though with the hefty price tag comes some pretty cool features. Wacom, maker of Bamboo Craft, recently come out with a version of their original Bamboo Craft. This latest edition boasts a newer, more sensitive pen stylus that allows for more natural hand writing, along with some impressive multi-touch features. These features work much like those on the iTouch, using gestures to indicate what you want it to do. Some of these features are basic track-pad functions, similar to a laptop mouse.

Another cheaper tablet option is the Genius G pen. You can pick it up for about $40. Because it is cheaper, it is not in the same range as the Bamboo Craft. It has the most basic features. Those features including simple Web browsing, replacing your mouse with the pen that comes with the tablet and hand-writing in documents.

While not the cheapest product, it is definitely a cheap alternative to the other non-tablet options. Such options are tablet PCs and laptops. Both are relatively new to the market in comparison to tablets, which have been around for a while. That being said, the G Pen may pack a better bang for your buck, as the other two options still have bugs and sensitivity issues to work out.

Wacom claims that their product allows you to get hands-on with your projects. From all appearances, that seems to be the case. While the Bamboo Craft may not be a cheap toy, it appears to be a fun one. It allows for a higher degree of precision on image-editing software.

This is probably not the device for your occasional image editor, though it is the perfect device for your image editing tinkerer who gets frustrated when using a clunky, inaccurate mouse, or someone who just wants to feel more in touch with their project. For these people the price is well worth all the voodoo it provides.

Cover and story photo by Kasey Sutphin