Tag Archives: beauty

Students’ Say On: Are You Beautiful?

We’ve all heard it before: Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But what does that really mean? Obviously, the straightforward meaning is that beauty cannot be determined by a general standard or popular opinion, but is instead judged by whoever is looking.  Hence the reason why your mom can tell you that you are the most beautiful person in the world, but someone else (usually someone you want to impress) thinks you’re just okay-looking. But I believe that beauty is not so much in the eye of the beholder, but is instead in the eye and the mind of the person themselves, regardless of the beholder. Whether you are beautiful is something that others can have an opinion on, but ultimately, it is a decision you make for yourself.

looking in mirror
“I believe that beauty is not so much in the eye of the beholder, but is instead in the eye and the mind of the person themselves.” Photo from: https://beyondthepulpitmabc.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/woman-looking-in-mirror.jpg

This week, we asked people on campus whether they believed they were beautiful or not. We got a wide range of answers. A popular response was “sometimes” or “on some days” and “maybe, but not right now.” Their reasoning was they felt they did not look the greatest at the moment because of stress or because they were not putting forth a lot of effort towards their appearance on that day. Some students viewed themselves as “in the middle” of the beauty spectrum and said they felt okay about themselves and were happy with themselves.

Some expressed little care about whether they were beautiful or not. “It’s not something I think about at all,” said one student, while another stated, “I don’t think of myself in that way.”

Others felt more strongly about the question.  “If we’re talking about statistically attractive, I think that’s bullshit. Beauty is inner,” remarked one student. Another student declared, “Yes!” when asked the question and continued with, “I’ve accepted myself, and a lot of other people say it all the time.”

Male students who we talked to were generally more sure about themselves and their looks than females. When asked whether he thought he was beautiful, one student responded with, “Yes,” and for his reason, he answered, “Because I look in the mirror every day.” Another guy’s reply was “Of course,” and when asked why, the answer was, “Look at me.”

Little White Snowflake

snowflakes
“Little white snowflakes falling on the pale white skin.” Photo from: https://writinginnorthnorfolk.files.wordpress.com/2015/12/snowflake-tears.jpg

Little white snowflake falling from the sky,
Little white sparkles falling on the curls.
White flakes hanging from the lashes,
Light blue eyes watching the gray clouds go by.
Watching the little white snowflakes falling all around,
One, Two, Three, time to fall down.
All the little white snowflakes acting as a bed,
Nice, soft, and very cold.
Little white snowflakes falling on the pale white skin.

The Snowpocalypse of 2016

One of the cons of the Snowpocalypse. Image from Shuttershock.
One of the cons of the Snowpocalypse. Image from Shuttershock.

This year, if you’re like me, you’ve been patiently waiting for snow, even if it was just a slight dusting. November went by, and then December, your dreams of snow slowly starting to become nothing but just that, a dream. I sat up late at night wishing upon that first star, praying for snow, asking the sweet heavens above for just a few snow flakes.

That’s when it happened. January came around, like it does every year, and gave us wishful snow lovers some hope. The days became colder, and my love for snow became stronger.

January 22, 2016 was the day that will be etched in my memory for the rest of my life.

The snowpocalypse was the most beautiful event I’ve ever witnessed. The snow began to fall in the early morning hours and didn’t cease until the following night. It created more than a foot of snow and made me happier than the day I graduated from high school.

The delicate precipitation covered the bare branches of the trees in my front lawn, making them whiter than the oscar nominees. The roads were covered in sleet and snow, making it impossible for me to make my daily McDonald’s run, but the breathtaking sight of the crisp, yet soft, snow was worth it. I imagined the snow singing, as it fell, “Baby, I’m worth it” and doing the naenae.

However, one of the best parts of the immense snowfall was the day school was cancelled. I remember the happiness that bubbled inside of me, releasing itself through my mouth in the form of exciting scream and chanting “It’s the best day ever!” and planning on sleeping in until at least noon. I stayed up almost all night watching murder documentaries and not feeling one ounce of guilt.

It was one of the most joyous, stunning, and life-changing experiences I’ve ever had, including the time same-sex marriage became legal. It wasn’t only beautiful to the eye but beautiful to the soul. I only hope that, one day, everyone can have the same deep emotional evolution on their soul that this Snowpocalypse had on me.

Self-love is the most important love

To us ladies, our looks are extremely important. We’ve been groomed our entire lives to look in the mirror and “fix” what’s wrong. We’ve been told we have to look presentable at all times. Overall, society has attached our value to our outer appearance.

Some women are strong and don’t let society tell them that their value is based on their appearances, and that’s amazing. If I had one wish for my fellow females, it’d be that we could all recognize that our value is not based on skin-deep characteristics. Our value can only be defined by ourselves.

mirror
“We’ve been groomed our entire lives to look in the mirror and “fix” what’s wrong.”

I believe the first step in finding value in yourself is to accept your flaws, whether they be physical or internal. If you’re lucky, when you’re born you’ll be surrounded by loved ones who will constantly remind you of how special and great you are. They’ll think the world of you and constantly praise you to remind you of your value. But what if those people weren’t there? What if, like a baby shark, the moment we were born we had to fend for ourselves and figure ourselves out on our own?

Some women are strong and don’t let society tell them that their value is based on their appearances, and that’s amazing. If I had one wish for my fellow females, it’d be that we could all recognize that our value is not based on skin-deep characteristics. Our value can only be defined by ourselves.

The truest love one can have is for themselves. I’m not talking about narcissism, I’m talking about self-love. Loving oneself is important to the way that we look at the world and the way we treat others. People who treat others badly are often recognizing a characteristic in the person they’re mistreating that they don’t like in themselves. A person who is narcissistic will often try to make others feel inferior, or will try to gain praise from others.

The key to being a valuable person who creates happiness in themselves and those around them is to find a happy medium between narcissism and insecurity. It’s good to be conscious of your flaws, but to accept them. It’s even more important, however, to recognize the good things in yourself and use them to uplift others.

As far as outward appearances go, it’s important to accept the things about yourself that you can’t change. It’s easy to look at a magazine and think, “wow, Beyonce is flawless, why don’t I look like her?” It’s important to remember that no one is perfect, especially when it comes to appearances. There are beautiful features and imperfections in every single person. Photoshop is used to cover those flaws that celebrities have and convince audiences that if they use a product it’ll do the same for them.

Have you ever thought about what makes a beautiful person? It’s easy to remember societies definition, but it’s also easy to realize just how dumb that is. I know many people who are beautiful on the outside as well as the inside and who I admire greatly. Although I think very highly of these people, society expects us to idolize celebrities and to yearn to be like them. At the end of the day, however, I feel myself wanting to mimic those people whom I know personally more than I’d ever want to mimic a celebrity. The beauty and inspiration you find immediately around you is more powerful than the paper cover of a magazine, as long as you allow it to be.

It can be so easy to fall for society’s examples of beauty and try your best to mimic them. It’s important to remember, however, that those celebrities or models in magazines don’t even look the way they’re presented. Accept your flaws, because everyone has them, but don’t forget that there are plenty of beautiful things in yourself that can be of extreme use to the rest of the world.

Her Beauty

Her beauty shines out like the Northern Star

Drawing in all eyes

"Her beauty created by adorning Goddesses." Graphic by Grace Higginbotham
“Her beauty created by adorning Goddesses.” Graphic by Grace Higginbotham

Her scent carries on the wind

Telling of her presence

Her eyes as blue as the vast oceans

Giving the slightest hint of paradise

Her beauty created by adorning Goddesses

In hopes to bring light to the darkened world

_______________________________

Her beauty shines out like a light in the darkness

Killing those who dare to touch it

Her scent carries on the polluted wind

A sweet poison to those around her

Her eyes as dark as the raging oceans

Causing the most unfortunate souls to wreck

Her beauty created by scornful Gods

In hopes to destroy the purest of hearts

 

Virginia is underrated

Many television shows and movies take place in great big cities with lots of people and towering buildings. The most common cities movies will take place in are Los Angeles and New York City, of course. These cities are beautiful in their own way, but California and New York are grossly overrated when you compare them to the state we live in.

Virginia has a wide range of diverse ecosystems. From the sandy beaches of Chincoteague to the rolling mountains of Southwest Virginia, there’s a lot to appreciate in this great state that we often take for granted. Growing up in an Air Force family, I got to move around and experience many wonderful places. As much as I hate to admit it, Virginia is probably the second most beautiful place I’ve lived in, if not the most beautiful.

Natural-Bridge-2
“These cities are beautiful in their own way, but California and New York are grossly overrated when you compare them to the state we live in.”

I was born in Florida and spent a total of 7 years of my life there. Florida will always be my home, but when I compare Florida to Virginia, I can appreciate the fact that this state is so colorful in comparison to Florida. Here, there are beautiful beaches, seemingly endless marshes, thick forests and towering hills. In Florida, there are swamps, lots of beaches and more swamps. Some areas of Florida have thick, beautiful woods but there are limited species of trees. Also, the geography is quite plain with very few hills and no mountains at all.

Even though I live very close to West Virginia, which is a beautiful state, overall it’s not as exciting to me. The mountains of West Virginia are beautiful and go on for days. That’s just the problem, though. The mountains go on throughout the whole state with no breaks as you drive through it. Although the mountains are majestic and make you feel very small, they begin to feel quite claustrophobic. The beauty of Virginia is that as you drive through it, you see varying ecosystems.

In September, my boyfriend and I traveled from Radford to Chincoteague. I had wanted to visit Chincoteague since I moved to Virginia and I’m so happy to have had the opportunity to finally visit this magical area. Driving through the Commonwealth of Virginia, there is a lot to see when compared to driving through West Virginia. Along with mountains, you can see  vineyards taking over the sides of hills, hundreds of small creeks along with larger flowing watersheds. In Richmond, you see skyscrapers carefully placed overlooking the James River. In Virginia Beach, the eye can see the ocean seemingly going on forever. My favorite part, however, is Chincoteague itself. On one side, there is a calm, slow-moving bay edged with marshes, and on the other, the roaring ocean slams against the sand and the wind takes your breath away with its salty-sweetness.

Although I miss the white-as-snow beaches of Florida, and the emerald-colored bathwater Gulf of Mexico, it still doesn’t compare to the diverse beauty that can be found in our grossly underrated state. Even though we all will dream of the great cities of Los Angeles and New York City, and long to live that Hollywood fairy-tale lifestyle, we’re still lucky. We’re lucky to live in a state that, even though it was settled long ago, still remains naturally beautiful.