Tag Archives: calories

Exercise’s optimum point

Exercising has various health advantages; however, if you are trying to get thinner, exercise by itself may not be sufficient. A new study suggests that bodies might adjust to more elevated amounts of physical activity, so you might not burn more calories even if you work out a lot.

If you're looking to lose weight, over-exercising is not the solution. Image from Hypnosis Chicago.
If you’re looking to lose weight, over-exercising is not the solution. Image from Hypnosis Chicago.

Scientists found that the individuals in the study who engaged in moderate levels of exercise burned about 200 more calories each day, on average, than those who had the most reduced levels of physical activity. The scientists found that the individuals who were the most physically active burned an identical amount of calories as the individuals who were moderately active.

It is not explicitly known why increased levels of exercise might not lead to burning more calories, the scientists said.

Study author Herman Pontzer, an associate professor of anthropology at the City University of New York said “You still have to exercise,” because physical activity is vital for your health.

In the new study, the scientists focused on the levels of exercise and the quantity of calories burned among 332 individuals ages 25 to 45 through the span of a week. The individuals in the study lived in Ghana, South Africa, the Seychelles (an island nation in the Indian Ocean), Jamaica and the United States.

The scientists discovered that there was a little though quantifiable connection between individuals’ physical activity level and the aggregate number of calories they burned per day. However, this connection held only when the scientists contrasted the individuals with moderate activity levels with the people who had the most inactive lifestyles. Individuals who had moderate levels of physical activity burned about 200 more calories every day, on average, than the individuals who were basically inactive, the scientists discovered.

Conversely, “The most physically active people expended the same amount of calories each day as people who were only moderately active,” Pontzer said in a statement.

The scientists said that these discoveries might imply that there is an optimum point for exercise. While too little physical activity is unhealthy, working out too much might provoke the body to make acclimations to adjust.

The study’s findings are published in the journal Current Biology.

The threat of the freshman fifteen

There’s one thing we all worry about when coming to college for the first time, and that’s the dreaded freshman fifteen. But what really changes after freshman year? Certainly not our eating habits– we’re stuck with pretty much the same old places to eat, on campus and off. So that leads me to believe that not only is the Freshman Fifteen a thing, but so is the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Fifteen, despite those being not near as fun to say.

Many of us know that the weight gain is coming, and we want to avoid it, but we’re stuck in a rut when it comes to figuring out a routine to keep the pounds away. Whether it be eating less or exercising more, we set goals that rarely become the reality unless you have absurd amounts of self-discipline and restraint.

Ever since I moved into Radford, I’ve been trying my best to keep a healthy diet, even though this often meant only one of two meals. A salad from Wild Greens or sushi from Hissho. Always more of a protein girl, I mostly traded the salads for a crunchy roll.

The other day, after weeks of sushi lunches and dinners, a good friend of mine posed a question. He said, “is sushi actually healthy for you? I feel like since it’s mostly rice, it’s not very good.” The more I thought about it, the more I figured he must be right. So naturally, as soon as I got home I looked up the answer.

As it so turns out, there are many different answers to the question, “is sushi good for you?” because there are many different elements that go into it. Fish is incredibly healthy, as it’s rich in omega-3’s, as well as other acids, and has plenty of different kinds of vitamins. Rice can help with energy and blood sugar levels as well as slowing down the aging process. Put them together and you get a healthy dish, right? Especially if you’re looking for a low-calorie meal. Seven pieces of salmon nigiri (sticky rice with a piece of raw salmon filet on top) is equivalent to about 478 calories, about ¼ of your average daily intake.

It’s when you start adding more ingredients, however, like the fried bits of crunchy rolls or the incessant amounts of soy sauce that you run into a problem.

While both can be delicious and even fairly good in moderation, when you continue to pour them on, they become quite unhealthy and even cancel out the benefits of the salmon and rice.

In the end, the lesson always comes down to: know what’s being put in your food. If you don’t trust it, don’t eat it. Find something else that you know is a healthy alternative. Or, if all else fails, you can always head to the gym and work your butt off.

Cup o’ calories

Photo Courtesy of Creative Commons.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, the recommended average daily caloric intake for a 21-year-old female is 2,000 calories and 2,600 for a 21-year-old man. The average number of calories in a Grande Starbucks beverage, made with the generic ingredients like 2 percent milk and whipped cream is 350 calories. That