Tag Archives: College students

Are Summer Jobs Realistic Anymore?

With the school year winding down and summer break almost upon us, a lot of students are starting to make plans for their summers. Some have vacations, some will simply be going home for the summer, and many will be looking for a summer job. College and life, in general, are expensive and we could all use a little extra cash in our pocket. People have been doing this for years, so it is no big deal, right? Not exactly.

starbucks worker
“Most businesses are not looking for part-time summer help anymore; most places want someone who is willing to work part-time year-round.” Photo from: http://cdn.thesimpledollar.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/starbucks-barista.jpg

The world is changing and progressing rapidly and things aren’t the same as they were 20, 10, or even five years ago. Most businesses are not looking for part-time summer help anymore; most places want someone who is willing to work part-time year-round, at the very least. And working year-round is not a very plausible option for most college students. First of all, most college students go home for the summer which is usually not very close to college. It can be two hours away, four hours away, or six or eight hours away. So even if a college student wanted to, the idea of having a year round job is not a possibility. And with that option gone, the job opportunities dwindle. Most places of business do not want to hire someone only to replace them after three months; that is just bad business.

If a college student lives near their college campus and does stay in the same area year-round, they will still run into similar problems. While it is not impossible to keep a job and go to college at the same time (plenty of college students do exactly that), it is difficult and not something that everyone can do. Any college student can tell you that college is hard and that it takes a lot of time and effort; many have to spend the vast majority of their time working on school work. It is not uncommon for them to have very little spare time left and it’s hard to work at a job when you only have a few spare hours. College is intensive, and the whole point of summer break is to give you an actual break, not spend it begging for a job that you’ll likely have to quit in a few months.

Stress Levels and Mental Health in College Students

College students usually get stressed when they have major tests in their classes. And it seems that stress levels spike when midterms and finals are approaching. However, most students feel stressed almost all of the time. It is said that one out of five students say they feel stressed most of the time (1). Stress can cause other mental health issues like anxiety disorders and depression. Stress, along with these other mental health disorders, has major effects on students’ day to day lives, and even their future.

It is said that stress is a precursor to anxiety or depression disorders. According to the National Alliance on Mental Health Illness, almost two-thirds of students drop out of school due to mental health reasons (1). Suicidal thoughts may be involved with these disorders. And 95 percent of suicides committed by students are related to anxiety and depression (1).

stressed student
“Stress, along with these other mental health disorders, has major effects on students’ day to day lives, and even their future.” Photo from: http://www.autismafter16.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/article_large/article-images/iStock_000010063963Small_0.jpg

Stress, anxiety and depression levels in students have risen dramatically since the 1980s (2). This means that there is also an increase in those going to their university’s mental health centers, if they are provided. According to Boston University statistics, in the 2014-2015 school year, students seeking psychiatric evaluation went from 120 students to 134, and those coming in because of a crisis increased from 647 students to 906 students (3). It’s happening all over the country. The Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors found that 73.1 percent of counseling center directors reported an increase in the severity of student mental health concerns (3).

Radford University has a Student Counseling Services office located in the basement of Tyler Hall. They offer individual, couple and group psychotherapy, medication evaluations and management, professional consultations and other services (4). Their offices are open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and their phone number is (540)-831-5226.

Mental health is one of the things that college students should take care of, especially in times of great stress. So, if you or someone you know is going through a rough patch, definitely try to make an appointment with the Counseling services; it could help you before things get too bad.

1 – http://stress.lovetoknow.com/Statistics_on_College_Student_Stress 2 – https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/theory-knowledge/201402/the-college-student-mental-health-crisis  3 – http://www.bu.edu/today/2016/mental-health-college-students/  4 – http://www.radford.edu/content/student-counseling/home.html

A Day in the Life of a College Student

Coming into college, you expect to suddenly feel like an adult. You are away from home for the first time, and suddenly you do not have anyone telling you what to do. Your classes are spread out throughout the day, and you don’t have to wake up at 6 a.m. every day to make sure you make it to homeroom before the bell. You are now responsible for this thing called time management. If you are a college student, your day may look a little like this . . .

 

- Photo from Amazon.com
“Your alarm goes off for the first time, and it will not be the last – Photo from Amazon.com

 

8:00 AM- Your alarm is going off for the first time, and it will not be the last.

8:15 AM- So, your goal was to get up earlier today and dress nicely for once. Just one day without sweatpants and the t-shirt you wore to bed last night.  It is now that you decide that that idea was dumb, and sleep is a lot more precious right now.

8:30 AM- Okay, okay. You are up now, but Facebook is not going to check itself. You end up getting distracted and watching cute cat videos for the next 15 minutes instead of getting up and getting dressed.

8:45 AM- Fifteen minutes before class starts and you still have to get out of bed, brush your teeth, and get to class. You can do this.

8:50 AM- You can do this. You can do this. Wait, what’s that smell? Chick-Fil-A breakfast sounds really good right now. Late to class with a bacon, egg, and cheese biscuit, or on time without one?

9:01 AM- It’s okay. Just a few minutes late and you still have breakfast. The professor isn’t even here yet, so really, you’re early.

9:02-11:50 AM- Made it through the first half of the day and now you don’t have class until 3:00. Is it worth it going all the way home just to come back in a few hours? No, so to the Bonnie.

12:00 PM- Of course, the Bonnie is an absolute madhouse. The Chick-Fil-A line is backed up to ABP, but it is so convenient. Chick-Fil-A twice in one day? Oh, who cares?

12:30 PM- Thirty minutes in line? It’s been worse. Now time to work on homework. Of course everyone and their mother decide to drop by and see you. Suddenly, homework is not as important.

4:00 PM- Finally out of class for the day. Now time to go home and be productive. Clean room, paper to write, socialize with friends. You can do this

4:15 PM- So. Much. To. Do. However, Grey’s Anatomy is calling your name. A nap sounds really good right now too….

7:00 PM- Okay, you did not mean to sleep that long, but that’s okay.

9:00 PM- Time to go to sleep and do it all again tomorrow.

 

A new way to treat depression

In a 2014 study, specialists at UCLA asked over 153,000 first year undergraduates to assess their general emotional health — and it was rated at the lowest level that UCLA has ever documented. Researchers found that nearly one in ten students said they frequently felt depressed.

A separate study by the American College Health Association discovered that more than fifty percent of colleges students have experienced “overwhelming anxiety” sometime over the past year. More than 30 percent of them said they have felt so depressed “that it was difficult to function.” Nearly 40 percent said they “felt things were hopeless.”

A new treatment for depression could significantly decrease its severity. Image from bkreader.com

Depression and anxiety with college students have been growing, and treatment of depression has been developing as well.

Analysts of a new study published in the most recent issue of Biological Psychiatry report effective decrease of depression symptoms in patients utilizing an innovative non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS.

In spite of the increasing amount of neurostimulation approaches and medications available, leftover side effects may be both upsetting and incapacitating. Customary VNS is a neurostimulation procedure that has been utilized to diminish treatment-resistant symptoms of depression. Clinical trials proposed that it delivered relative advantage that developed over drawn out periods of time. Be that as it may, it was additionally expensive and required dangerous neurosurgery to embed the vagal nerve stimulators.

Drs. Peijing Rong and Jiliang Fang at the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, working together with Jian Kong’s analysis group at Harvard Medical School, researched a new, altered type of VNS called transcutaneous VNS, which alternatively stimulates the vagus nerve through electrodes put into the ear.

Patients with major depressive disorder who volunteered for the study were either given transcutaneous VNS or placebo VNS and experienced a functional neuroimaging scan both before and after being treated for one month.

Contrasted with patients who were given placebo VNS, the patients who were given actual transcutaneous VNS displayed noteworthy improvement of their symptoms of depression. This change was linked with expanded functional connectivity amid the default mode system and precuneus and orbital prefrontal cortex, a critical system in the brain known that is changed in depression.

As claimed by Rong, this treatment can significantly downsize the asperity of depression and shows promise for use later on in the future.

Video: Living with diabetes in college

One in every five people will live with diabetes at some point in their lives according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund, and the number of individuals between 18 and 29 who have the disease is the fastest growing of any age group.

This disease, which was once considered rare in people ages 18 to 29, is now becoming an epidemic. The numbers have jumped 30% in the last decade and they are growing faster each year. Continue reading Video: Living with diabetes in college