Tag Archives: perks

5 perks of being socially awkward

Being socially awkward is one of my many specialties, although I’ve grown into, not quite a social butterfly, but perhaps a caterpillar that’s turned into a butterfly but I’m just peeking my head out of the cocoon. I’ve been pretty awkward since I can remember. When I moved to Florida in the 3rd grade, my way of making friends was asking their favorite color or how they felt about sea horses.

Although I’ve learned more appropriate ways to interact with strangers, I still find myself wracking my brain for a good way to keep a conversation going as I sit in awkward silence. There are often nights when I’m out and about and all I’m thinking about is how much I want to go home, put my hair up and watch Netflix.

It's hard to act normal. Graphic by Janie Maitland
It’s hard to act normal. Graphic by Janie Maitland

Many may view being socially awkward as a curse, but I think there are a lot of perks to being socially awkward.

1. You never feel guilty about staying in.

If you ever find yourself having a night where going out sounds unbearable, you won’t feel the least bit guilty about making an excuse to stay in. Your friends may drunk call you and tell you what an amazing night they’re having and you’ll be happy for them, but not as happy as you are binge-watching Gossip Girl.

2. You don’t have to fight for beer

We’ve all been there. Girls, you’re usually up against the bar staring whoever is working the keg in the eye wondering, “am I not pretty enough for your Natty Light?” Guys, you’re going to be standing in the back being pushed out of the way by drunk girls. If you’re lucky enough to make it to the bar, you’re probably not getting a beer until all of the ladies have a cup in their hand.

This is a scenario us socially awkward people don’t typically have to deal with. There isn’t a crowd I have to push through to get to my fridge.

3. Food

They don’t serve food at parties, at least most of the time. Us awkward turtles have a short adventure to get whatever snacks we find ourselves feigning for. If we go out, however, that walk to Benny’s or Jimmy John’s can seem like an adventure through Middle Earth, which is sometimes fun. Let’s be honest, though. Sitting at home and watching your favorite show on Netflix while munching always beats staring at drunk girls dig through their purse as they hold up the line.

4. Not having to dress up

My favorite part of going out is usually getting ready. Nowadays, though, I’m usually exhausted by the time I look party-worthy. Putting on leggings and a big t-shirt takes no time at all and I still have energy to do important things like make chicken nuggets and spoon with my dog.

5. Not having to awkward your way out of a conversation with a drunk person

Staying in and avoiding people means not having to awkwardly explain to that drunk guy -who’s talking a little too close- that you’re not interested. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve gotten trapped in lengthy, slow conversations with a drunk male party-goer who couldn’t read my signals that I was in no way interested in him. Body language doesn’t phase the intoxicated and being as awkward as I am, I don’t have the social skills to talk my way out of it. Typically I wind up flagging down one of my friends and “going to the bathroom,” when we really just sneak to the other side of the room and give the guy about 30 seconds to forget his interest in me.

Being socially awkward isn’t as bad as many make it out to be. Although it’s difficult when I actually want to be social, I’m usually thankful that my awkwardness renders me incapable of going out and making bad decisions.

 

 

Commuting Hell!

Although off-campus living can come with a few perks, there are also some huge downsides to it, including transportation to campus and around Radford. If you live outside of town, you may drive twenty or thirty minutes every day to get to class. Early classes are a huge struggle, especially if they’re at 8 a.m. This is made even more challenging when you’re forced to get up earlier to make the drive.

RU Transit

Although there is the option to use public transportation, it may be difficult for those with tight schedules and those who have jobs to get to. Maintaining a job and finding the time to get school work done is also a juggling act that many off-campus students have to do week by week.

When arriving on campus, parking can be a huge task in itself. You’ve got to worry about getting to the school early enough to be able to find a parking space and you’ve got to pay for a parking pass. This does not help those of us that have difficulty budgeting our time as well as budgeting anything else.

Commuters have an entirely different school experience than other students. They’ve got to pay a fortune in gas money and other car expenses each semester. They also have to transform their home into a study-friendly zone, because living away from other students can make focusing on textbooks difficult. Speaking of textbooks, commuters have to lug those around. Often, they carry more things to school each day. Forgetting materials at home ruin the effort of getting to school.

Traffic complications may cause missed classes. If you’ve already reached your allotted amount of missed classes and are stuck far from your school, beware. Winter is coming! That means that snow may be a major obstacle in the near future. If this winter is anything like what people are saying, there are definitely going to be complications.

To avoid missing classes due to bad weather, find an on-campus buddy that you can crash with for a couple of days. Wait out the storm with this friend so that you can keep attending classes. Don’t let weather be the reason you fail a class.