Tag Archives: programs

Is fall television still a big deal?

For decades, television programming has been centered on a big viewing tradition, Fall television.  America’s biggest, oldest, and most watched broadcasting networks such as NBC, ABC, CBS, & FOX pretentiously advertise the upcoming viewing season with endless TV commercials, and ads that appear in other news outlets such as magazines, newspapers, and social media. But this is a tradition that should be done away with in 2015.

Fall TV used to be a big deal. Graphic by Katie Gibson
Fall TV used to be a big deal. Graphic by Katie Gibson

For starters, TV executives often tend to cater to one specific group of viewers. The 18-25 year old demographic. Since the invention of TV, this demographic was who watched the most Television programs; however, times have changed, and the average young American leans more toward online streaming services.

These streaming sites which have caught most people’s attention, such as Netflix, Hulu plus, or Amazon prime, have come in and changed how and when young adults watch television.

Not only boosting cheap monthly prices, but also giving viewers the ability to view at their demand. TV execs should take notice of this drastic change and cater more specifically to an audience of a certain age. Since viewing patterns have changed so should they.

Also, many 18-25 year olds myself included, don’t seem to watch television the way our parents did. So, having a fall primetime schedule is useless.

Of course, there are popular shows from Fall TV that have premiered recently and raked in some of the best ratings cable television has seen in the past few years. For example, shows like Fox’s Empire or ABC’S How to Get Away with Murder, have gained a huge following becoming trending topics on social media site twitter every week once a new episode premieres, even having their own special emoticon each week that relates to the show. But that’s the only good that has come out of TV in recent years. Big networks like those aforementioned should, have their hottest new shows sent directly to online streaming services.

Maybe then they will gain a bigger following and re-captures those sky-high ratings of past decades. Do you agree or disagree with my sentiments? Feel free to leave your opinion in the comments section.

As I lay dying – the dismantling of liberal arts

It’s a cliche at this point; you’ve heard it dozens of times. The fatal moment when some well-meaning individual asks, “so what are you in school for?”

Tell them you’re majoring in english, history, fine arts, or a myriad of other liberal arts programs and you’re inevitably hit with the painfully overused “oh- so you’re going to be a Barista then?”

The stigma of having a liberal arts degree is discouraging. Graphic from Wyka-Warzecha
The stigma of having a liberal arts degree is discouraging. Graphic from Wyka-Warzecha

The notion that some fields don’t matter or are utterly pointless is a concept that’s proliferated through societies around the world over the past few years.

With the importance of STEM subjects, an acronym for the academic disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and math, politicians and policymakers across the nation have been criticizing humanities majors.

Florida’s Governor Rick Scott said while trying to defund liberal arts programs in 2011 “Is it a vital interest of the state to have more anthropologists? I don’t think so.”

It’s not just Governor Scott either. In 2014 President Obama himself said in one of his speeches, “I promise you, folks can make a lot more, potentially, with skilled manufacturing or the trades than they might with an art history degree.”

To be a humanities major is to face contemptuous glances and long-winded diatribes about narrow job prospects and minuscule salaries. Little do the nay-sayers know is that 74% of employers would hire a liberal arts major, and that by the age of 56, those with degrees outside of the pre-professional sphere are likely to earn $2,000 more per year.

Sadly these statistics don’t resound on a global level.

Most recently, this September Japan’s Minister of Education, Hakuban Shimomura publicly urged the nation’s universities and colleges to downsize or completely shut down their humanities and social science departments. His logic being that such subjects did little to benefit society.

So far 43 universities have complied with his request, and no longer have programs ranging from economics to pre law to social work. Our current world view is catastrophic for the long term health of society.

With vital disciplines being stifled everyday the world loses a wealth of knowledge, and incredibly talented individuals are denied access to fields they can thrive in. Instead, people are being forced into professions they don’t enjoy, negatively affecting the quality of the work being produced and their mental well being.

A world full of engineers and no therapists is as doomed to fail as a civilization with only farmers and no doctors.

Let them joke about the geography majors, critique the political science experts, and deride linguists.

Let them try to tip the equilibrium under the false gospel that the study of human quirks is of less value than the study of machines.

We’ll take the tacky Starbucks jibes with a smile, knowing that without us, the world would be a much less interesting place.