Tag Archives: why we can’t have nice things

WWCHNT: Starbucks Holiday Cup Fiasco of 2015

2015 has been dubbed, “the year everyone was offended by everything.” As the year comes to a close, some groups are going out with a bang and continuing that title with their narrative of “the War on Christmas.”

Starbucks loves fall and the holidays. During the fall, everyone trips over themselves to get their paws on a Pumpkin Spice Latte. During the winter, everyone loses their mind over the delicious peppermint mocha. Every year, Starbucks gets in the holiday spirit by decorating their famous white cups with their logo in red. In the past, the red has been accompanied by traditional symbols of Christmas such as a cute penguin ice skating, snowflakes and Christmas trees. This year, however, Starbucks opted for a cozy, minimalist style of just plain red.

And so started what I will call the Starbucks Holiday Cup Fiasco of 2015.

Although my Facebook demographic consists of mostly left-wingers, there was a notable outrage over the lack of Christmas cheer appearing on Starbucks cups on November 1st. As usual, radical Christians are citing this as part of their made-up War on Christmas.

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“We can’t have nice things because of the idea of a War on Christmas.”

“We can’t have nice things because of the idea of a War on Christmas.”

We can’t have nice things because of the idea of a War on Christmas. As soon as Halloween was over, everyone began freaking out about Christmas. Sure, Christmas isn’t too far away and I fully encourage getting shopping done a bit early. However, we still have Thanksgiving to be excited over. Thanksgiving has become a source of controversy the past few years as Black Friday has, in the words of Jon Stewart, “eaten Christmas.”

Black Friday, in the past, has started the morning after Thanksgiving. In recent years, it’s started as early as Thanksgiving morning.

Nice things are also hard to come by because people, specifically radical Christians, take any respect for other religions as disrespect for their own. Starbucks hasn’t even made any public announcement stating that they have traded their usual holiday cups for warm red ones in order to be “politically correct.” Besides the obvious Christmas symbols being absent, red itself is still a Christmas color. However, radical Christians are always on the lookout for signs that the world doesn’t love Jesus and that there’s a war on not only Christmas but Christianity.

I find it ironic that many times, these Christians who are getting up-in-arms over a paper coffee cup, are the same people who laugh in the face of other groups when they have blatantly been discriminated against. Some of these same Christians who think Starbucks has an anti-Christian agenda are the same people who support a historically racist symbol.

Overall the idea of a War on Christmas is what’s really ruining the idea of Christmas for me. Because people take a silly holiday so seriously, it’s made me take it less seriously. If we could all just get along, stop reading into everything and taking it as a personal attack then maybe–just maybe–we could have nice things.

 

Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Tragic reactions

Last week we saw a horrible tragedy unfold over the course of four days, which resulted in a total of four dead and one terrified city. Boston has arguably gone through more last week than any city in America has since New York City during 9/11. Take a moment to be thankful that it’s finally over.

Every time there’s a tragedy, we see people react in many different ways on Facebook and Twitter. It’s a nice thing when we see millions of people come together to show their support for the victims. However, if you’ve been following the pattern of my articles, you’d know that nothing is ever that simple. Continue reading Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Tragic reactions

Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Polarization

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Picture from Know Your Meme.

Remember when we were kids and all we had to fight over was which Pokémon was the coolest or which Superhero would win in a fight? As children, it was our civic duty to argue with each other and prove that your way was the only way. Then we grew up, and those quarrels were replaced with new ones. Whether it’s our hatred for Justin Bieber, One Direction, swag, PewDiePie or the dozens of other trends that preceded them, it always seems that when something becomes popular too quickly, there will never fail to be a counter-movement of people who hate that thing. Like Newton’s third law said first, with every action comes an equal and opposite reaction. Continue reading Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Polarization